Mandeville Jewelers

Anne Dale has been known for her jewelry creations, especially benefiting local charities and most recently for the discovery of Louisiana’s gemstone, LaPearlite®.

This Mandeville Jewelers latest venture, however, have made her creations more affordable and have captured the dichotomy of the south Louisiana culture, where one goes to a crawfish boil in the afternoon and a formal Mardi Gras ball in the evening. It’s called Second Line jewelry.

Made of 316L stainless steel, the highest grade of stainless steel available and used in the medical profession, the new creations fill a void the Mandeville jewelers business for a lesser-priced line.

The Second Line collection features four collections: I Love New Orleans, Who Dat, Saints (which is licensed by the NFL) and A Way-of-Life. The fleur de lis collection is included in the I love New Orleans category and jewelry showcasing the seafood industry, such as the shrimp boot jewelry and oysters, are in the way of life category. The new line offers many opportunities, including traveling to seafood festivals and shows. The use of the new metal also has several advantages, including the fact that they are hypoallergenic, being of the same type of metal used for pins and implants in the medical profession. The highly polished items are indicative of silver, but without the price tag. It’s also harder and less likely to bend.

Men’s gifts includes money clips, cuff links and key chains while women can revel in necklaces, earrings, anklets and bracelets.

Sunday, December 2, 2012 By Debbie Glover St. Tammany News

Classy oyster shells may be bumping the agate as the state’s official gemstone. But all would not be lost for agate found in Louisiana gravel, a legislative committee decided Wednesday. It would be the state’s newly designated official mineral.

The House Judiciary Committee approved House Bill 246 by Rep. Scott Simon, R-Abita Springs, sending it forward for more debate.

The agate would be replaced as the official gemstone by the cabochon-cut gemstone, which Simon said is derived from the shell of a species of oyster found off the Louisiana coast.

Simon’s bill originally sought to designate LaPearlite as the state gemstone, but he said that is a trademarked name and cannot be used. He amended the bill to designate the specific mollusk shell — from the species of Crassostrea virginica — for the honor.

Screenshot (66)

Anne Dale, a gemologist who lives in the Mandeville portion of Simon’s district, said that she was impressed by the beauty of the oyster shell as a material to make jewelry.

“This could be a big positive for our seafood industry” at a time when the industry is still hurting nationally, Simon said. He pointed out that during the past decade, “the seafood industry has suffered from the perfect storm,” including several hurricanes, the Deepwater Horizon oil spill and river water being diverted from the Bonnet Carre and Morganza spillways to relieve Mississippi River flooding.

 Designation of an official gemstone and mineral allows state officials to use them on official state documents.
Source: NOLA.com

St. Tammany News

Wednesday, January 25, 2012

Local artisan designs bicentennial jewelry

GIA Certified Gemologist Anne Dale

Local artisan, gemologist and jeweler Anne Dale discovered a new gemstone that will be used as part of the official jewelry commemorating Louisiana’s bicentennial this year. A brown pelican with a LaPearlite belly was selected to represent the state for the bicentennial, and members of the bicentennial committee will each have a lapel pin.

Continue reading →


By Benjamin Mann
New Orleans, La., Mar 17, 2011 / 08:03 am
EWTN
EWTN New Orleans, famous for its celebration of Mardi Gras just before Ash Wednesday, has another Catholic-derived tradition that falls during Lent. The “Saint Joseph altar,” originally a custom of Italian families and parishes, has become woven into the culture of the American south.

Continue reading →


New Orleans PendantYou can find “New Orleans” on a map bordered by the 17th street canal, Lake Pontchartrain, the mighty Mississippi River and the Gulf of Mexico.You will also find New Orleans in the hearts of the Louisiana people and those around the world who have experienced it … Jazz, Mardi Gras, The French Quarter, Creole and Cajun Cuisine.

But My New Orleans is more. It is bigger.

The Big Easy goes beyond the borderlines of this great city. It is always a part of me wherever I go.

My New Orleans goes north up the Mississippi River to Natchez, strung together by mighty Oak Trees, Spanish Moss and a path of majestic plantation homes from an era gone by.

My New Orleans goes east where my family vacationed on the sandy white beaches of Waveland, Gulfport and Biloxi.

My New Orleans goes south through the bayous and swamps, where as a young girl my father would take me fishing, down the Mississippi Delta and to the Gulf of Mexico.

My New Orleans gets its spice from the west through Baton Rouge and to the heart of Acadia (Cajuns)……….Lafayette.

My New Orleans is like a good gumbo with necessary ingredients to a recipe rich in culture.

A gumbo that is stirred by the people where our southern hospitality welcomes each ingredient to melt into the other, to give it the flavor of something you will always take with you wherever you go.Once you taste it… You will know what it means to love New Orleans.

That’s my home… that’s My New Orleans.

That’s why I have created this design to remind everyone in our surrounding cities including the coastal region and beyond, much like the Mississippi River, our bloodline flows beyond the borders of this great city.

It is Our New Orleans.

It belongs to everyone.

by Anne Dale